index_corner.gif - 11174 Bytes Banner.jpg - 11843 Bytes
Justice League
UPDATES


Follow Pazsaz Entertainment Network at Twitter!  Become a fan of Pazsaz Entertainment Network on Facebook!  Connect to Pazsaz Entertainment Network on Myspace!  See what Pazsaz Entertainment Network likes on Pinterest  Read the Pazsaz Entertainment Network Blog
OUR SPONSORS

index_center_banner.gif - 14958 Bytes

Bookmark and Share
 
Bent Interviewby Pattye Grippo    

Amanda Peet and David Walton

This is an interview with Amanda Peet, David Walton, and Tad Quill on March 7, 2012 about the show Bent.

Question:
Could David and Amanda talk a little bit about what made them wanted to be a part of the project?

David Walton:
Simple for me. I heard Amanda Peet was in it.

Amanda Peet:
I wasn't really looking to be in T.V. because I have two kids and my husband's doing Game of Thrones so it was definitely very stressful to fall in love with Tad's script. I just love the writing and I love the character and then when Tad introduced me to David Walton that was about it.

Question:
What did you find challenging about your role, Amanda?

Amanda Peet:
I think comedy's hard because you're supposed to forget that it's a comedy. So I always find that it's like a little more difficult but I hopefully I was okay.

David Walton:
You were amazing.

Question:
What do you think, Tad?

Tad Quill:
I think she was amazing. I really did. I mean, Amanda's a fantastic actress but the comedy was real great. The thing that I love so much about Amanda's performance is that it comes from such a natural place. It doesn't feel like she's pushing for the joke. It just comes from her character and it's very real and it makes it all the more funny to me. And she also has the ability to play the emotional moments and that's a real combination and pretty unique.

Question:
There have been a lot of new romantic comedies debuting this year already. What do you think it is about Bent that's going to set it apart from the other shows?

Amanda Peet:
When I read the script I felt like it was sort of uniquely charming and there are a lot of kind of super quirky gross out comedies and there a lot of sort of softer comedies that aren't really grown up. I just felt like it was really charming and very real and I think that it's hard to find something that's romantic on T.V. that's also sort of sexy and suspenseful in a love story way.

David Walton:
I think what a lot of T.V. shows I watch do is they'll try to push for a lot of jokes and then it's almost like the writers are like, uh oh, we gotta put some heart in here and in the end they kind of jam it in there and try to get the audience somewhat moved as well. And Tad has this incredible ability to kind of infuse touching engaging heartfelt moments throughout an episode so by the end you never have to shift into like oh, this is the sappy moment but you are touched and you are moved in a way and tired of laughing. And I think it's super-unique.

Tad Quill:
Amanda and David have such incredible chemistry. I think that alone makes it unique I think and we also have just a really remarkable ensemble around them. I mean, we have Jeff Tambor who's done so many things and is so talented but he also brings sort of an emotional depth to it. You have J.B. Smoove who's just laugh out loud funny and Jessie Clements who I have not seen in a straight up comedy before but he's from Friday Night Lights and he was hilarious. And we have Margo Harshman who is wonderful and Joey King. It's just a wonderful cast.

Question:
Amanda and David, I was also wondering how did you guys get involved with the show? Did you guys audition or were you guys contacted for it?

David Walton:
As far as I knew Amanda was attached and then I was called in to do a chemistry read with her. And then beat out, what was it, 10 million dudes, 10 million guys? That's about right, yes.

Tad Quill:
It was 5 million.

David Walton:
It was just a chemistry read. I went into read and a few days later I was told I got the part so I had known Tad from Perfect Couples. And Amanda how did you, I think Tad and Amanda knew each other as well.

Amanda Peet:
Yes, I knew Tad many years ago and I felt I always thought he was really smart and a really good writer so I definitely felt like we had a really good shot at making something really funny and really smart and that's really rare of network television I think.

Question:
I know we've talked about how you all got involved with the show but how did the whole idea for the show come together? What was behind it and how did it become a show?

Tad Quill:
I had wanted to do a romantic comedy and I wanted to do something set in Los Angeles and I wanted to do something with people sort of at a crossroads in their life where they're all starting over. And I feel like hopefully the town of Venice in L.A. comes through as kind of a character in the show. I feel it's like a place people go - a lot of people I know are at a crossroads and starting over either divorced or sort of searching for something. I also wanted to do an ensemble in addition to the romantic comedy. So that's sort of where the idea came from.

Question:
Amanda and David, what do you think your characters bring to the table or bring to the show that we aren't seeing on other shows?

Amanda Peet:
I think that first of all I feel like David Walton is just a revelation. I mean, he's so brilliant and funny and I don't think there's anybody like him and I think it's a really unique and very real sort of depiction of somebody who's a little bit in a state of arrested development but he has a really good heart and he has really good instincts. And as Tad was saying with he's just at this crossroad and meets this very serious woman who has a lot of responsibility. So I think what's fun about it is the sort of how different their lifestyles are and whether or not they can overcome that.

Question:
Amanda, your character's very uptight but she comes across as very likeable. I wanted to ask you a little how hard was that to make a character that could be kind of unlikable despite the sense that she's so high strung. Was that difficult for you to approach and how did you approach her?

Amanda Peet:
I just try to leave it up to Tad and I think most were in the writing so some characters are written and they're just sort of very strident and there's no gaps there, there's no vulnerability there and I don't think that Tad knows how to write characters that are that flat. So you have nothing to worry about as long as you just go with the writing.

Question:
I wanted to ask you about the Alex and Pete's story set up to be a little bit of we think they like each other but they're not together. You know, how will that play out over the course of the season? Will there be a lot of will they or won't they tensions?

Amanda Peet:
Hopefully.

David Walton:
Absolutely. Yes, I think what we're hearing back from people who have seen some advanced screenings and stuff is that there's rally an addictive quality to the show where you really don't want to stop watching which I think it kind of rare for comedies. So we're hoping that brings people back but ultimately I think a lot of the addiction is the love dance which can go on for many years.

Question:
Do you guys want to see them to get together though? Are you rooting for that?

Amanda Peet:
Yes.

David Walton:
But it will be long dance hopefully.

Question:
You have both been on other T.V. series that were critically acclaimed and really liked by critics but didn't have the success and didn't last. Did those experiences change how you feel about approaching a show like this an launching it? Are you more cautiously optimistic or has having this on previous shows affect you when this one's about to launch?

David Walton:
I try to be cautiously optimistic but I'll be devastated if this show doesn't go but then you recover. So I just like being all out optimistic and I think obviously we're in a hyper-competitive industry and there's no way of predicting anything. But what good does it do to be cautious? I can't find any reason to be.

David Walton:
Amanda's going to be opposite of me. I've taken the governor off my caution and she's going to match it with a nice balanced sane character throughout the off season.

Question:
Could you tell me a little bit about the chemistry between the characters and where that's coming from?

David Walton:
I think the chemistry is just sort of a lightning in the bottle type thing where you have Tad's writing it's very naturalistic and funny and I wish I was as witty as my character is. So when you have that kind of rapid fire machine gun talking chemistry things start to come alive. And then Amanda never not had chemistry with her co-stars. I just feel honored to be able to act with her.

She's an amazing actress. So funny and so charming and vulnerable. She can play like five different things at once and it all comes through. There's not a person I've met when I say I'm in the show with Amanda Peet it's not like oh my god I love her. So I think a lot of that just because she's just very generous. And that's a lot of what chemistry has to do with.

Question:
Where do you think it's coming for the characters? You've got the guy that's sort of maybe had a little trouble in his life and opposites attract kind of thing that's going on between them?

David Walton:
Yes, I mean who knows why attractions happen. They're still even this day, this age of science and figuring everything out it's still a pretty mysterious thing. But on the surface, yes she's very attractive, she's smarter than most of the girls out of probably every girl I ever met and she doesn't take any B.S. And at the same time she seems to get my sense of humor. When I say my I mean Pete Riggins sense of humor and so there's just an ease in which they immediately start connecting and that's how people get married. You know, when they met they meet each other and it was just easy.

Amanda Peet:
I always think it's an opposites attract kind of thing. I feel it was definitely really well-portrayed in the writing and so David and I just kind of followed what was there. And I think it's always exciting to see two people who kind of can't stand each other or can't stand the way the other one lives and throw in some attraction and see what happens.

Question:
Is there a certain thing about romantic comedies that makes them work the best?

Amanda Peet:
Yes, it's all about your partner. So once we found David Walton it became very exciting and I think that it's sort of an ineffable quality when you strike gold with a romantic comedy and I guess I attribute it to being partners with David Walton primarily. And I think Tad's a very smart and a very funny guy and I think while these two people are very different they definitely have that kind of witty repartee that I always love seeing in a romantic comedy where you have a really formidable opponent who is equally saucy and who can really give you a run for your money. I always find that to be really sexy so hopefully we achieve that. I don't' know how badly were focused on achieving that very thing but hopefully that's the by-product.

Question:
Does the style feel a little bit different in some ways, the kind of clipped dialogue to be not the pauses between words one person will say something right on top of another or even before the other person's finished?

Amanda Peet:
It's because we didn't have a lot of money for shooting. We were always taught that faster is funnier. I don't know. Yes, so that's what I was always told so I guess that's what we were trying to do.

Question:
Do you prefer television over movies?

Amanda Peet:
I like good writing so it doesn't matter to me whether it's a play or a T.V. show or a movie. There are plenty of movies that are really badly written and there are plenty of T.V. shows that are sublime. So I just try to go and make a writer fall in love with me who's a great writer. Not fall in love with me but make somebody want to write for me.

Question:
Are you finding on television now that the stories and the writing is getting better?

Amanda Peet:
Yes. I think it's pretty incredible what you can see now especially for women my age. Never thought I'd say that term. But, yes, I think that a lot of the roles in movies aren't as fun because you're not really part of the main plot or your playing the lovely wife or the girlfriend or something like that and it's not very it's always sort of an ancillary role where in T.V. I feel like we have really exciting roles that are fun, complicated.

Question:
What catches you? Is there a part of it that catches you or it has to be the whole package that catches you?

Amanda Peet:
I think it's both. Obviously probably like page 7 there were a couple of quotable lines from Tad's script that I loved all of which he cut. Usually I get attached to couple of lines and then I decide the writer's a good writer and then casting is a lot of it. And you know, once David walked into the room I was besotted and so was Tad. So that was that.

Question:
David, working with Amanda we've talked about the chemistry but obviously you were familiar with the work but what is it about her that you think makes her a great actress?

David Walton:
I have a specific example. We were playing in episode 2 where we kind of get close to kissing and I was like looking in her eyes and I swear there were about ten emotions that flashed within like a second and just in her eyeballs, but it was this vulnerability and strength and love and lust and fear and all these just like flashed before our eyes and that was by far the most impressive thing I've ever seen in this scene that I've been in with anybody.

And I think it's what makes her a movie star and gives her that star quality and she's so pretty and she can play these characters like in the last question or ten minutes ago there was a question like how do you make these tough women likable. And it's a true talent that's very fearless not only her who can actually do it to the extent that she does. It's a real honor to be in the same show as her.

Question:
When did you first move out to California and what impression did it make on you and how much do you think the fact that these guys live in Venice just influences the characters, what they're like?

Amanda Peet:
I moved out here to do Jack and Jill when I was 28. So I'm 40. So I've been here for a long time but I think I'm probably a pretty purebred New Yorker type of person but I think for my character in some ways it's okay to have that come across. It was more David's character who is more kind of really embedded in the vibe of Venice and that kind of laid back vibe. And I think probably part of what we were going for is that something my character needs to learn to embrace.

David Walton:
I was going to ask Tad what his great line from his first episode where she's like you're all mad at me and you're like it's cool to be stoned at 35 or something.

Tad Quill:
And then you say Venice.

David Walton:
Yes. I think not so much about Amanda's character but much more about mine. That's part of the opposites attracting.

Question:
Amanda, as far as you know it takes your character a long time to embrace this Venice vibe. What about you when you moved out there? Did it take you a long time to embrace the vibe of being in California?

Amanda Peet:
I'm still trying to embrace the vibe of being in California. When I'm 80 I'll still be trying.

Question:
Could you tell us a little about the young actress who plays Amanda's daughter?

Tad Quill:
That's Joey King. She is an amazing little actress and when Amanda became attached Joey was the first person we met with and I think it was love at first sight, and she's got a lot going on. She's always jamming off to do a Batman movie or The Wizard of Oz, she's probably by far the most famous. She's funny but she's also opposed to a lot of child actors you feel like they're just being cute, with Joey she's really acting.

Question:
Being you guys they're burning off episodes pretty quickly doing the whole back to back thing. How do you guys feel about that? Are you a bit worried a little bit that they've chosen to lay them out that way?

Tad Quill:
No, I mean, it's obviously it's very competitive out there but the nature of the show it definitely has the serialized quality to a romantic comedy. The feedback that we've gotten so far is that once somebody watches the first one they want to watch the second one. So that's what's being the thinking of putting them back to back like that to really hook people in and I think it actually plays well to the strength of the show.

Question:
Tad, how do you prep a show that's so based on this relationship? Did you have an end game sort of in your head as to where it's going to go or do you sort of like figure out what's going to happen next with them organically depending on what happens in the episode?

Tad Quill:
No, no we definitely have an end game but it's always figuring out as you go. It's just always a fine balance between keeping the audience engaged and feeling like things are progressing but also moving incrementally forward as little as possible with a relationship because obstacles are the key to romantic comedy. So it's always that balance but it's between giving the audience enough so they're hooked in and not frustrated by it but also not too much that you're not enjoying the sort of dance that they're doing.

Question:
Are we going to see any serious progression between them in the episodes or is that going to be or are we still going to be left with the tension?

David Walton:
Yes, I was just going to say you have to wait and find out. I mean, I think there's a real doozy season finale. Don't miss that one.

Question:
Between the relationship of Amanda's character and David's character, what are three songs you guys for the initial like premier, what are three songs that you guys could compare your relationship to in the beginning? Three songs?

David Walton:
I Want to Know What Love Is by Foreigner.

Amanda Peet:
Ain't Nobody by Chaka Khan.

David Walton:
And Hits from the Bong.

Amanda Peet:
You Sexy Mother Fucker by Prince. Mine were better, David.

Question:
What's your advice to actors?

Amanda Peet:
Don't do it. I'm kidding I guess.

David Walton:
It depends what stage you're at but if you're just coming out of college or high school or whatever and just want to become an actor I would say you've got to really work at it.

  • Return to Articles at Pazsaz Entertainment Network
  •  
    Site Sponsors Check this out!    

    Disneyland
    ARTICLES
    OUR SPONSORS

    Search the Pazsaz Entertainment Network:

    Custom Search
    | Copyright & Disclaimer | FAQ | Privacy Policy | Partners | Discussion Board | Feedback |
    Copyright © 1991-2017, Pazsaz Entertainment Network, All Rights Reserved.

    Space