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The Biggest Loser Interviewby Pattye Grippo    

This is a transcript of an interview with trainers Scott Mitchell, Damien Woody, and Zina Garrison on September 9, 2014 about the show The Biggest Loser.

The Biggest Loser

Question:
Scott, I wanted to ask you particularly about the effect of sleep apnea. I have used the machine for like 14 years myself. I wanted to ask how long ago did you get diagnosed with it, how long have you had the sleeping machine, and how much of a factor do you think that is?

Scott Mitchell:
I was diagnosed about six years ago. I had really gotten to a point where I was not happy about going to bed at night. I would wake up with headaches, a dry throat, and I was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea due to really gaining weight. I've had the machine and then when I came on the Biggest Loser they re-diagnosed my symptoms and I had the worst case of any participant they have had on the show. I was actually stopping breathing 92 times an hour. So without the machine I probably would be dead right now. This is something that people have actually died from and in my instance it's just brought on by weight gain. And you actually have a narrowing of your airway and when you relax at night it actually closes off and it causes you to stop breathing and it wakes you up.

Question:
Reflecting the title Glory Days, because people don't realize until they look back how glorious days you had at some point. I mean, you had one season that was spectacular for the Lions; 32 touchdown passes, 12 interceptions, just a great season. Reflect for a moment on what your best season felt like and then how low did you feel when the whole weight thing got you down later?

Scott Mitchell:
I lived my childhood dream. I got to be one of 32 people that had a job that I had. I was among the best of the best in the world and to do that every week is an absolutely thrilling experience. I mean, my whole NFL career for me was really a dream come true. I loved every minute of it. I miss being able to do that today. And there's just nothing that can actually match the feeling you have of being in front of 80,000 people, several million more watching on television, and to throw a touchdown pass to win a game that you called an audible or you called the play. It's just absolutely exhilarating.

As life goes on and you become a regular person again, it's a tough challenge. It's a tough challenge for everyone. And then I had many conversations even with Damien about this very thing about how hard it is when it's all over. And to move forward in your life and still have a productive life is a challenging thing. I felt like I had adjusted well, but I really got to a point where I just really struggled with my weight and it was something that I couldn't manage on my own. And I had really gotten to a point where I had just given up. And I have gained weight and lost weight over the past 14 years. I feel really a divine miracle I stumbled onto the Biggest Loser and it has been a life changing experience for me. I'm just - I have really connected and found a foundation where I can move forward and have a very healthy and productive life.

Question:
What is it about the new format of the show that attracted each of you to it?

Zina Garrison:
For me what was very attractive first and foremost is that they were using former athletes. And being a little bit vain for the weight that I had gotten and just kind of have taken myself out of the picture for a moment, to know that you have other athletes that had struggles were struggling with weight just like myself was a big reason why I knew I wanted to do it. Because I wouldn't want to be just the only athlete on the show.

But knowing that we had all been at the top of our game at one time we started struggling with our weight, to be amongst the fraternity and sorority that I'm accustomed to was a big attribute for me to join the show.

Damien Woody:
I think for me along the lines of what Zina had said just competing against athletes who has been at the pinnacle of their profession, just top notch, whether at all different levels of their athletic careers. I thought it was very intriguing. But for me it was more about competition, competing against myself. I think if you ask any competitor, it's all about finding those competitive juices and allowing them to flourish. And being in this environment, that's exactly what has happened. When you're around competitive people those competitive juices tend to come out. And that has been one of the great things about the Biggest Loser this year.

Scott Mitchell:
Mine is a little different. I actually didn't want to be on the show and I really felt through a divine miracle I ended up finding it and being here. My dad passed away from diabetes in January and I kind of had thrown in the towel and just thought I'm going to be a fat person the rest of my life. And when he died I just said that's my future, that's what's going to happen to me.

I really on accident stumbled across an open audition for the Biggest Loser in Salt Lake City. I live in Utah. And then when I said former athlete, high school, college, and professional, I just felt this almost like a voice inside of me that said Scott, you need to do this. And so I filled out an online application and actually chickened out. I didn't go to the audition. I just didn't want to get back in the public life and be subjected to a lot of criticism, which I'm sure I would take for being this in shape professional athlete to 366 pounds. And I just wasn't ready to handle that.

And three weeks later I got a phone call from a casting director and they said we'd really like to talk to you about being on the show and I just felt this same voice. And so I just felt like it was kind of a divine miracle that I found the show. I certainly wasn't looking for it. I think I would have gone on the show whether they were athletes or not. I just felt like I needed help with weight; that it was something that I couldn't get a handle on by myself, and I felt like this was a great place to do it, even if it was in a very public on a national stage forum.

Question:
How different were your expectations from what the reality was?

Zina Garrison:
Expectations for me is like I kind of went in it with like no expectation. I had seen a couple of episodes of the show but I didn't follow it, follow it. So for me I didn't have like this overly like expectation other than I knew I wanted to do something for myself and this was a great opportunity.

Damien Woody:
For me I had never watched the Biggest Loser. My wife and kids, they're huge fans of the show but I just went into it just with my eyes wide open just thinking you know what, this is a great opportunity for me to tackle a problem that has been plaguing me for years even throughout my playing career. I always struggled with weight. So I just looked at the Biggest Loser as you know what, this is an opportunity to squash this bug once and for all and that has just been my mindset.

Scott Mitchell:
My expectation coming in was like look, I know how to lose weight, I'm a former athlete how hard can this really be. And when I got here, I have just been shocked about how much this is so much about your emotions, about dealing with the reasons why you gain weight as opposed to just gaining weight.

And so it has been a real tough thing to have to open up and unravel myself emotionally and get to the bottom of my issues. And that was a real challenge and it has quite frankly been the hardest damn thing I've ever done in my life both from a physical, emotional, mental. It's just been an absolute grind but really a life-changing experience. I have really found who I am, I have found what I'm fighting for in my life, and I found a platform where I can build and live a healthy life.

Question:
Hi Scott. I just wanted to ask you was the weight gain that you had post-career, was that something that happened quickly as you transitioned out of the NFL or was this something that has happened over this extended period of time between when you stopped playing and you appeared on the Biggest Loser?

Scott Mitchell:
My weight gain was a gradual thing. You know, I, like Damien, I would gain weight every off season. I always stayed at a good playing weight during the season and then every off season I would gain 15, 20 pounds and then I'd have to lose it to get back into the season. And then when my career was over, that 20 pounds just kind of went to 40 pounds and it went to 60 pounds and then I'd lose some weight. And I just kind of went on this yo-yo up and down on my weight and I just finally got to a point where and it was probably about a year ago I just said I'm just tired of fighting this battle. I just don't seem to win.

I looked at my family genetics and it's just like hey we're a bunch of fat people and that's just - I had kind of resigned myself to that's how the rest of my life was going to be. You know, I just really enjoy eating food and a lot of it and a lot of it that's not good for you. And I'm like why should I have to not indulge myself and I just kind of gave up.

Question:
There's so much discussion obviously with NFL players as it relates to health after their playing career and 99% of it is focused around concussions. Obviously obesity is a huge issue, diabetes and all the things that go along with that. Do you feel like the NFL or NFL PA kind of arms guys as they leave the league with how to actually treat their bodies when they're not in that 12-month training routine? And I don't know if you have seen the photos of example like Jordan Gross who just retired. He has already dropped like 70 pounds after leaving the Panthers, 70 or 60 pounds. Are guys armed with that as they leave the league to actually take care of themselves?

Scott Mitchell:
I can only speak from my own experience and I was never given any advice or direction about how my how to handle my post-career as it relates to my health or my diet or anything like that. I know there's a huge emphasis from the NFL to be more conscious of people leaving the game in a lot of aspects, not just their health.

The funny thing is I'd run into more guys like Jordan former offensive linemen. I'm like okay wait a minute, this is wrong because now you look like I looked when I played and I look like you looked when you played. And I'm like what's wrong with this picture here. So - but as far as any conscious effort, I'm not aware of any.

Question:
Damien, I don't know if you'd be able to answer that question because you retired like at a slightly different time in your career. Did you run into anything like that where they were trying to educate guys as they exited the league?

Damien Woody:
The league has come up with a lot more programs designed to help guys in their post career. Obviously when it comes to the NFL it looks better for the league, the shield when guys are thriving post career. So the league has done a pretty good job in the past few years, along with the NFL PA, of providing programs for guys not only financial but also health, making sure that guys have the avenues that they need in order to transition out of the league and thrive once their NFL career is done.

Question:
How about them Lions last night?

Scott Mitchell:
It's nice to see them win their season opener and especially in a nationally televised game and it's nice to see the stars shine. You know, Matt Stafford played great and I think he's got an amazing arm and just an amazing ability. And Megatron is Megatron and so it's always good that the Lions win.

Damien Woody:
The one thing though, we have never disputed the talent that the Lions have had. I mean, that was on full display on Monday night. It's always been a question of discipline and they had some penalty issues but hopefully with Jim Caldwell as the head coach, those things can get cleaned up and the Lions can really show with all that talent why they deserve to be one of the teams mentioned as one of the better teams in the National Football League.

Question:
I know Michigan has a history of having a lot of contestants on the show. What has been your interaction with Andrea and Wanda Lee and how do the Michigan contestants do on the show this season?

Scott Mitchell:
Tell how they're doing. One thing I can say is one of the really choice surprises to me on being on the show is the relationships with people that you develop. And you really empathize with the story that they have, the struggle that they have. We have a commonality together, regardless of whether we're from Michigan or we played tennis or we played football or soccer or whatever it may be. And just to spend so much intimate time with people and get to know them.

And I just have a tremendous affection for every contestant that I have been on the show with this year, including Andrea and Wanda Lee and Damien and Zina as well. I mean one of the best experiences I had on the show was a conversation I actually had with Damien that was just - it was just really special. And so that has been a real pleasant and enjoyable surprise for me.

Damien Woody:
And this is Damien. Just to piggyback what Scott was talking about it's the one thing about the show is when you get to know people, you get to learn their background and everybody we all have something in common obviously and struggle with our weight. But just learning people's background, the struggles that each individual has gone through. I mean, you can learn from everybody's personal experience and just being able to draw from people's stories has really been inspiring.

And like my grandfather always told me you should always learn something new every day. And that's, you know - I think that's what we've all been doing is learning something new from drawing from each other's experiences.

Question:
How overwhelming was it to be at the ranch?

Zina Garrison:
For me coming from an individual sport, it was very overwhelming for me. I'm kind of used to like everything like I want it, the way I want it because I'm the one who that was paying for it. It was a dramatic experience but it was very humbling and very uplifting to know that there are a lot of great people there and you just like Scott and Damien said, you're just kind of pulling from each other. So that was my toughest thing is just coming from kind of a prima donna sport and then put in the house with everybody was a little traumatic for me.

Damien Woody:
I think and for me I feel like it has definitely been an experience because you go from just being out and about, to all of the sudden being cut off. You know, you're cut off from everything and it's like you have to now face your issues head-on. There's no running or hiding from anything. You're going to while you're on the ranch you're going to face all your issues, all your demons, everything that's in the closet.

And but it definitely feels good but it's scary at the same time because those are the things that you've been running away from for a long time. So just being on the ranch is it's something that it's been tough to deal with, but it's definitely something that I've been glad to be able to face along this journey.

Scott Mitchell:
The ranch to me is like a cocoon is for a caterpillar transforming into a butterfly. And when my dad passed away, I had this experience with him where I was trying to make sense of my dad died of being overweight. He died from complications from diabetes. And as I was sitting in the intensive care room, they closed the door and these butterflies appeared and I just had this overwhelming feeling come to me that like your dad's a caterpillar. He's going to die, he's going to go into a cocoon, but one day he'll rise again as a beautiful butterfly.

And I felt like that being on the ranch that I came here as this ugly caterpillar and through this really magical place that is all of what has been described by Damien and Zina you get completely isolated from the world. There's no distractions, no phone, no contact with your family and it's like your life stops. Nothing happens.

And you're in this small place but everything is going on, everything is changing. You have this metamorphosis happening internally whether it's emotionally or physically or spiritually and then when you're done, you leave here as this grand and majestic butterfly that can soar to the greatest heights and you can become your very best self. And that's what the ranch means to me.

Question:
What is the one thing you want to be able to do again that you have not done because of the weight gain?

Zina Garrison:
For me I would love to be able to play a week of tennis. Now that might sound very crazy, but with weight gain because on my joints I could hit for like an hour, hour and a half, sometimes even two, but then I could not play for another month and just be able to run around on the court. And just for the enjoyment of knowing that I can do it again and not have to worry about I can only hit for a little bit and I know that I'm out for like a month or two and I can't even hit balls. That's one thing.

And then the other thing is like to be able to go out shopping and not be out of breath. I mean, something as simple as that. You know, you kind of just have to take a step back after you've walked an enormous amount of time and you're winded. Like I hated being winded that's the thing that like bothered me more than anything. Because, I mean, I'm a former athlete and to be winded just from walking for a couple of minutes is ridiculous.

Damien Woody:
For me being I'm a father of seven to me it's simple. Like riding roller coasters with my kids that's something that something that I used to do but with the weight gain it just I just really couldn't - either I wasn't comfortable or I just couldn't do it at all. And I just when you're not able to do things with your kids or just really fully enjoy the experience with your kids that it makes you it depresses you, it makes you feel bad. So just being able to get back to that stage, I think that would be really cool.

Scott Mitchell:
This is Scott. Oh my goodness, there's so many simple things in life you just really appreciate being able to do. I mean, getting up out of the chair without actually having to rock yourself three or four times before you get up. The way clothes feel amazing on you when you don't have to use the expandable waist line and you wear baggy clothes to hide all of the weight.

But I really and it's all that stuff the roller coaster, I mean, all of that just being active. But for me it's about five years from now that I'm at a healthy weight and that I'm present every day. I checked out. I quit. I gave up on my life physically and really emotionally. And so I want to be present every day. That's what I want to do. I want to seize every moment of every day of the rest of my life with the people that I love doing the things that I'm passionate about.

Question:
Scott I wouldn't mind if you reflected a little bit on your time in Detroit both living in the area and then playing for the Lions, maybe some of the highs and lows. And then also I'm curious looking back now how you kind of view the infamous Halloween costume.

Scott Mitchell:
So let me wrap this up in a nutshell. One of my greatest experiences was the Detroit Lions made my childhood dream a reality. I became a starting quarterback in the National Football League. I met a tremendous amount of great people living in Detroit. Michigan is an absolutely beautiful place. I met my wife in Michigan and we've been married for 15 years. And so there's a lot of really good things. I have a sister who still lives in Michigan. We have a lot of my wife's family, a lot of friends. I love that part about it.

And I love the guys that I played with. We had some great teams and some great people. And I have a connection with Herman Moore that goes beyond football and that's a special thing, we had a special chemistry that it was just a really neat thing. And I got to play with the Hall of Famer Barry Sanders and had a front row seat to just some amazing, amazing athletic feats that I know definitely in my era there was no one that was capable of doing what he did. And of course I taught him a good portion of that.

But that was a special treat. You know, looking back I really appreciate those great players and their commitment and how they performed. And to share in that and to be a part of that was very cool. The challenging thing for me is I feel like we got short-changed. I feel like they dismantled something that was really special and I wanted an opportunity to finish it out and see it through to its fruition. I really believe we had the nucleus of a great team that could have won Super Bowls. And I wanted the chance to be a part of that.

I made a commitment to go there and I showed up at that facility at 6:30 every morning during the off season. I lived in Michigan, I was a part of the community. And I took a lot of shots. I took a lot of abuse but I was okay with that because I was committed to that process and winning championships. And I just feel circumstances that were really beyond my control eliminated that. And that's hard. You know, that's a hard thing to deal with. But I'm certainly very grateful, I had an amazing experience there.

You have tough times. I mean the whole Halloween costume thing was pre-planned. And if you're in an NFL locker room there is - it's a different world. And the joking that goes on, the razzing, the trash talking things are not off limits. You know, you can have conversations and that probably in the public eye would be viewed the wrong way and that was certainly one of those situations. We had rookie parties where players dressed up and made fun of coaches and/or other players and that was just the common thing. Unfortunately, it was caught in a public forum and I have more people that remember me because of that then anything I did or didn't do on the field and that's unfortunate.

The funny thing, I went in to Coach Fontes the next day and I had no idea how negative an impact that experience would have. And I just said I'm really sorry if I have offended you in any way. And he was great about things. He said hey I understand I was at a party last night. I just want to know did I have a good time? So he was good about it. It was just sometimes things unfortunately in the media kind of get blown out of proportion as to really how big a deal they are.

Question:
Why do you think weight gain can be an issue for some former athletes? Do you think it's because after years of always having to be right on top of things and in the gym all the time, all of the sudden that's gone?

Zina Garrison:
For me I think it's a twofold, I know for me and especially playing an individual sport. And playing an individual sport like tennis where it's always if you gain five pounds, you're looked at. I developed an eating disorder from 19 to 25. So I was always dealing with some form of body image that was going on.

And but the biggest thing is like when I finished, like and I wasn't exercising as much as I was before, my portion sizes were the same and that definitely got me in trouble. And then when I gained an enormous amount of weight from 40 to 50, I mean with early menopause and things like that coming on, I mean, your body, your hormones, everything is changing.

For me it was just like way too much - too big portion sizes. Then I stopped eating a little bit and then when you do start eating everything is just piled on. So portion sizes and exercises, I didn't like to exercise that much because I did so much of it when I was training. And I'm the type of person when I go hard, I go hard. It was, I mean, it got me to where I am now.

Damien Woody:
For me it was when you're playing a sport, especially football, it burns a tremendous amount of calories. So so for me I felt like I could eat whatever I wanted because between training, practices, and games I mean, I'm burning probably like 10,000 plus calories easily. For me nutrition wasn't a big deal because I knew I could just burn it off.

And then once you're out of the game, those habits never change. Your eating habits stay the same but you're sedentary, you're not as active as you were when you were playing a team sport like football. And then we all know that if you're not as active but you continue to eat those calories that's what leads to the weight gain and I think that's what really caught up with me.

Scott Mitchell:
I echo what Zina and Damien have said but I add this. When I retired from football, I retired from everything. I was like I don't want to go back in the gym. I had to do that for work. And I looked at the gym as a job and so I just said I'm retired from all of this.

But the one thing you're exposed to in the NFL is like amazingly good food. I mean, you go to a restaurant and they're like here, sit here. I never ordered from a menu, they just brought out food and it was amazingly good and just full of calories. And so you get used to that rich, really good food. And then when you retire, it certainly doesn't change.

And I love fine cuisine and I love a lot of it, too. And so that was the hard thing to wrap myself around was how can I still have these amazing tastes and flavors but not just have a ridiculous amount of calories involved in it. And I have actually found it, but that was a big challenge for me when I retired was it was just this great food.

Question:
All three of you spent so much time training and in the gym and working out and while you were competing. Do you have to like rethink the gym just in general in transitioning from training for sports versus training for health and weight loss?

Zina Garrison:
It's funny because we'll tap into like what I have learned when I was playing tennis, it all kind of clicks back in. It's still pretty much the same. But what I have learned I'm one of the oldest ones on the show. What I have learned as I've gotten older I have to do things a little differently, you know because I don't burn as fast as I would have when I was 20 or even when I was 30. So I've had to add a lot more things into my program as far as making sure flexibility as well as cardio and also weights as well. So yes, I had to rethink it for sure.

Damien Woody:
I think for me the biggest thing that I have learned is I look at my situation as I'm I have a disease and I need to maintain it in order to keep it at bay. If I don't exercise regularly, if I don't do all the necessary things, then I'll find myself back to where I started. And Lord knows I don't want to go back there.

So it's just all about being disciplined, finding that routine. But also doing things that's going to keep me interested. Because a lot of times if you just go run on the treadmill for an hour every day, that's boring. You know, that's what tends to happen to a lot of people, they get bored. So it's all about finding those things to do as far as your training that keeps you interested, keeps you in it. You know, and also making sure you're getting that exercise that you need in order to live the healthy lifestyle.

Scott Mitchell:
What I have found and learned is that to find things that are sustainable for me that I'll consistently do and that fit my personality. I can be very active and not ever have to go into a gym. I live in a beautiful state in Utah where there is a lot to do and see outdoors. I have five kids who absolutely want my attention. And there's never a day where I can't be very active in my life and get a good workout and do the things that I need to do to make it a healthy lifestyle.

I found that I enjoy cycling. I have found that I actually like the swimming pools. And these are the things that as I get older aren't so demanding on me physically that I can get a really good workout and not feel my joints and be able to get up the next day. So it's finding something that is sustainable for me and fits my personality.

Question:
But do you think for women that men sometimes are given a little leeway for gaining weight and women maybe are not given as much it's frowned upon more with women?

Zina Garrison:
I like the way you said a little leeway. No, you guys are given a big leeway. No it is because, I mean, the way the world perceives you know, women it's what we weigh, how we look. I mean all the beauty products are around different things of the way a female looks.

It is a little unfair. I think now, though, people are, you know - men are starting to get way more into their health and I think it's because people are becoming just healthier overall. We want to try to live longer. But it's something that women have battled for years. So I definitely think that right now we're in a world of body conscious body image.

And I think we're on a greater upswing with body image because now we're really starting to understand that people come in all different shapes, forms, and sizes but that doesn't still mean that you're healthy. I mean, I have a friend that was he was like 6'3???, weighs probably 140 pounds and he had a stroke and he's 33 years old and didn't eat well at all. So it's just a matter I think we're in that age now people are just trying to have - we have more information, more knowledge in trying to be healthier for themselves to live longer.

Question:
What is the single most profound thing you learned about yourself that you didn't know going in there?

Zina Garrison:
I had no idea that I because now I'm in coaching and just me personally, people have said this to me before, it's like I like to control things. I like to be ahead of the picture of the way that I kind of want to figure it out and plan it out and all of that.

When I got on the ranch I really understood that I was not in control. And that's a very hard thing for me. That's one of the biggest things that helped me is to realize that other people do the trainers and everyone, they do - they are - they know their profession, they're good at their professions. You have to let go and listen to them just like I'm asking other people that I'm teaching to let go and listen to me as a professional in tennis.

The control had been a huge thing that I've had to let go but it has definitely been something that has really just kind of set me on my way to dreaming again. Because I stopped dreaming. I stopped dreaming about it. I figured I'm 50 years old, nobody is going to want to know anything else about me, I don't have anything else to give. So letting go some control has really helped me.

Damien Woody:
I think the biggest thing that I've learned is how good I feel being able to express myself emotionally. I have always been the type of guy that especially in football you're just taught never to show that vulnerability because it's a sign of weakness. And I've just always kind of put up that wall and I've always got to be strong for others.

But being on the ranch and just learning throughout this whole process is that it's okay to cry, it's okay to show those emotions, because I teach that to my kids. And just being able to express those, all those different emotions has really helped me become a more well rounded person. And I think that's the biggest thing that I can take from this whole experience.

Scott Mitchell:
There are so many things that I could - epiphanies that I've had, but one that really jumps out to me is that my joy is found in my sorrow. In my life I tend to focus so much on all of the things that didn't happen, all of the hurt, all of the failures, the pain. And I didn't recognize that without that, without having to fail, I couldn't appreciate or understand what joy was. And so the greater joy I have in life was really caused by the greater sorrow that I have to bear. It gives me the perspective and the appreciation of joy. And I'm more compassionate, I'm more kind, I'm more patient, I'm more loving because of the sorrows that have created joy in my life and moving forward in my life to identify all of the things that bring me joy.

And that I've been able to do that, what an amazing life I have. What a great chance I have to experience just this beautiful world that we live in and all the people that mean so much to me and the things that matter to me. And so it has been about understanding where my joy comes from and actually embracing the joy of my life.

Question:
Well it sounds like this series is well-titled Glory Days. I think all of you sound like you're reliving new glory days. So it sounds like it's going to be real exciting to watch. Thank y'all so much and thanks for the experience and we're looking forward to seeing it.

Question:
You have mentioned several times a miracle and divine intervention and so forth. Was religion a big part of your life earlier in your life, throughout your life, and has it become like more or less of a factor now when you reach your turning points?

Scott Mitchell:
The answer is it has always been a factor in my life. And going through this experience has actually reinforced and even solidified my faith. And it's really where I plant my foundation. It's something that I can always rely on that it is that never-changing rock that just keeps me steady and gives me the direction and focus and patience and kindness and love that I need to move forward in my life.

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