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Eureka Interviewby Pattye Grippo    

This is an Interview from June 29, 2011 with Colin Ferguson (Jack Carter) and Salli Richardson-Whitfield (Allison Blake) about the television series Eureka.

Colin and Salli

Question:
How do you think the dynamic within the cast has changed as the show has progressed, now that we're in the fourth season?

Colin Ferguson:
It's been an amazing thing to watch actually, because we obviously have actors of all different ages in the cast, and so we've watch sort of the younger members of the cast sort of grow up and become artists in their own right, and that's been an amazing journey to follow. I would say, as far as all the adults go, it's stunning that we haven't had more problems. You hear about casts and sort of insiding and whatnot, and everyone really gets along. I think we get along better now than we ever have, and that's a really odd thing to be, for our calendar of six years, into a process like this and to find everybody sort of really doing - going above and beyond to respect each other's process and respect, the foibles and the complications of working together. So as far as the people go, we've never gotten along better.

Question:
Salli, in what way would you say that you are most like and least like your character of Allison?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Well, it's funny. I think that our characters have become even more alike as the seasons have gone one. I think that I'm not quite as hard and as tough as I seem. In the last season or so you get to see a much softer side of Allison with her being a mom, but still having to juggle work. So, I think that we've - our characters actually have come much closer and she's very much like me now.

Question:
Colin, you've been both an actor and a director now, which of these do you find more challenging and which do you prefer?

Colin Ferguson:
Sal's also been an actor and a director at this point two times over. What do I like more? At this point, I don't know. About a year ago I would have answered the question saying, "Hands down, directing." It was new, it was fresh, it was so exciting, and now the three episodes and a movie at this point and I sort of get it, and I really embrace both in the same way now. It really is project by project, scene by scene in, what you can really do.

An honest answer to the question is I'm really tired, so I'm looking forward to a break so I can sort of replug in and get more energy to do anything at all. But what I like about directing more is that you get the story earlier, you can affect change in a more profound way, and stay with the story longer, and that's a really rewarding process to go through. As an actor, you really are a professional athlete or a hired gun, you sort of show up on the day and you do your little magic and that's what goes on tape. And you're like it's a gun slinger-type job. The problem is you show up so late that sometimes you can't affect the change that you'd like to. So, it's good and bad for both, but I think we'd all sort of have the same answer; we really, really enjoy doing both.

Question:
You are on one of the most high-tech series and the first episode coming back you're both riding horses. Had you guys ridden horses in other roles before, and what was it like?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I had ridden before. Pretty much my first big film moving to L.A. I had to ride a horse and I've done maybe another job, but I think for all of us we had some time before to get on some horses and get it back together. Luckily for me I was supposed to look ridiculous on the horse, so I didn't have to be an expert. And Colin had ridden a lot of horses and he's very athletic, so he always gets everything together.

Colin Ferguson:
I had ridden a couple of times, but not anything profound and not something where I'd say I was comfortable. And as much as we get a bunch of work, it was mostly the stunt doubles.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I know, we were very angry about that.

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah, it was like, "What the hell." but it was fun. Anytime you get to do something like that where you're sort of outside of your zone it's fantastic. And it's more, for me anyway, it was less about the actual skill of riding the horse and more about getting to know your horse. So after a couple days it was significantly easier because you just knew the horse's idiosyncrasy.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
And of course, Colin has the mean horse.

Colin Ferguson:
I did have the mean horse. He kept biting on me and I was like, "Is it me?" And then the trainer was like, "No, that's what he does.

Question:
It's such an unusual show that you can pick up a script and have no idea what kind of a weird direction take yet, and you range all the way from comedy to romance to, like in this one, mostly dead-dead serious drama, and then you find yourself riding a horse and so forth. What's it like when you pick up a script and find one of these weird surprises?

Colin Ferguson:
It depends on the surprise. I mean sometimes you open up the script and you go, "Oh, that's going to be amazing," and then you open up a script and you go, "Really? Like, really?", and we're going to... okay? "All right. All right." Because it could be the middle of winter and they're like, "Okay, so you're stuck in t-shirts on the top of a blizzard," and then you cuss them.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
What is so fun about doing the show too, is that you're not stuck in a goofy comedy all the time, you're not stuck just doing straight drama or straight little get ups. You really get to do different things all the time and I think that that's what keeps it fresh for us, and why we continue to get better because you get to stretch and you get to do different things and I think that's why the fans like the show. You're not bored by the same thing every time.

Question:
Salli, can you talk about some of the issues that Allison has with Jack now in relation to where things left off?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
He thinks this is funny because by the time we get to this season I don't know what's going on.

Colin Ferguson:
We're in the middle of shooting the season that'll air in 2012, so we sort of have all that downloaded into our head, and so it's now sort of going, "Right." So, about a year ago???

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I think that the issues that we have now, that we're trying this new relationship on, or seeing if this is going to happen, that puts a different dynamic into working together. So, it's like working with your husband or wife, how do you now balance both of the two things? And I think that that's where we start getting into trouble with each other. Of course nothing can ever be perfect because that would be boring with us if we were just all lovey dovey and everything was great. So, I think that that's where we start getting into trouble, how can we work together and do both, and where is that line?

Question:
Colin, is Jack oblivious to how Allison is feeling or does he have a hard time admitting it?

Colin Ferguson:
No, I don't think he's oblivious, but it's a funny thing asking me about relationships; not my forte. I'm not terribly good at it. But no, he's not oblivious, but at the same time it's difficult when you're working with someone and having a relationship with them, as these two characters do. So, you have to give each other more space and you have to give each other sort of the latitude to have more off days than normally you would.

Allison is a character that has two kids, so you really got to move slowly and be really patient with that if you're going to try to partner with that. So, I think he's patient, I think he's aware of it, but we're dealing with something in the next episodes we shoot, which is that he's not aware of, so there are still bumps and problems to come.

Question:
You two have really good chemistry. Could you talk about that process, how that evolves, and what you like about working with the other person?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I think from the very beginning when Colin and I first did our first scene together you never know if you're going to have chemistry with someone, and it s just naturally there. And I feel really corny when I say this, but there's something that clicks, because obviously off camera we're very brother/sister, jokey-jokey, "Oh, God, we've got to kiss."

But, as soon as that camera rolls and I look into Colin's eyes, there's something that clicks and I always find an instant connection that makes all of my feelings just sort of come right up to the forefront, and I feel everything I'm saying with him. And it's very lucky for us and for me, I just naturally have a wonderful connection with him when we're working. I love it and we know how to work with each other on and off camera. I know what he needs to do to get what he needs, and he knows what I need, and we make allowances for each other and we try not to step on each other's toes.

Colin Ferguson:
That definitely attributes to Sal. I mean, we haven't had a fight in six years of working together, and that's not because I'm easy to work with, that's because Salli's amazing to work with. She's just top notch and, Sal, I'm actually really flattered and floored by your last answer to that question, so that was really sweet. Thanks.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Well, it's true.

Question:
In the first half of the fourth season, a lot of substantial things happened on the show. For the second half of this fourth season what are you excited about the fans seeing?

Colin Ferguson:
We pick up sort of right where we left off with sort of the big sort of arc of the season, basically Eureka going into space. And I was concerned when we started it that it was going to be just sort of a path like, "Oh, this is the mission de jour that we're going to on for 13," but actually balloons and blossoms into this fantastically complex plot. And then, at the end of the season you're about see it kicks into the whole next year in a way that you completely don't expect. What I'm really looking forward to seeing is sort of everyone even next summer going, "Oh, my God. Really? That's happening now?" Because it's sort of Eureka going into space and do they go into space, and it's really interesting.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I think that's what so hard for us is that, I mean really all these episodes that we've shot that you may not see for a little while, everything is just getting so much better and it's like you just want everyone to know and you want them to see all this great stuff that's coming. They've really put everything together well, so it's sort of hard to hold back and not tell you everything that's going on because it's so exciting.

Question:
You talked a little bit about Jack and Allison being together, finally, with no issues. Has that been fun for you to know that there's no problems, we're going to get to do this for a little while?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Right, I think they've found a way to put us together, but not make it boring.

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah, it's never straightforward. I mean, that's what I really liked about it, and that's what actually Sal and I fought against really hard for a long time, because the temptation is like, "Oh, they're together. Now you guys kiss in every scene," and we're sort of going, "No, no, no, no, no, it's not realistic and it's not interesting." And they've done a really good job of having very real problems that you deal with in relationships that keep it both I guess affectionate and clear that there's love there, but at the same time very clear that it's not easy, and (life) is not easy and relationships aren't easy, and I appreciate the realism of that.

Question:
Last year you rebooted with the new timeline and everything and it reenergized the show a lot, and that seems to still be going through with these new episodes. Could you talk about how things change when you had the new timeline? And are you surprised that the show's been around and lasted so long?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I think you're always surprised when your show gets picked up the first time. But now I think the show is so good especially the ones we're shooting now in these last few seasons, that I would be more surprised when we're not picked up because it's such a good show now and it's just gotten so much better.

Colin Ferguson:
I would agree with that. I think the show is as good as it's ever been. That had to do with sort of a big shift down here in the writers room and, sort of finally finding our footing and getting our way back after the writer's strike and all of the big Hollywood problems that happened. It made it really difficult even to know if you were going to have a job. So, we have a really solid group of writers and a really sort of core group of people that hasn't changed, so that's why it sort of feels really energized and is really firing on all cylinders.

As far as the reboot and the energy that happens with that, I think that's symptomatic of the changes that happened. We really found our footing and the reboot was sort of this symbolic gesture on behalf of the network that we were allowed to do what we wanted to do. I mean, they went in to the network and said, "We want to go back in time, and then come back and change everything and never address it." And normally when you got into a network and say that they go, "No." One of the biggest characters on the show is the Town, so to change the Town is a really tall order and it was a big sign off on behalf of the network as a gesture to say that the writers knew what they were doing. And I think the writers sort of, when they got that gesture, they filled confidence and it just redoubled on itself until we sort of had the energy that we have now.

Plus, the casting that's gone on has been unbelievably helpful. I mean we've got Felicia Day, we've got Wil Wheaton, we have Wallace Shawn coming in, we have Dave Foley coming in. That's great to get all those people in to the show.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
And they fit perfectly and we love them. These are people who they don't come on and you're like, "Oh, my God, can we get rid of these people as soon as possible." They're just wonderful people to be around and you - and they just fit in our show so perfectly.

Colin Ferguson:
There was a decision made to write me lighter because I was just getting too tired and really bored at the sound of my own voice. So what happened was all of a sudden these characters who were so developed and so worthy of having this big long plots are getting way more screen time, and very deservedly and I think it makes the show a lot more interesting.

Question:
Salli, what did you do with your big cutout of Allison that you took from Cafe DM last year?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Oh, it's so funny. It is sitting in my children's playroom and I think it's so Mommy can be there when I'm stuck in Vancouver. But, yes, I did steal my cutout and it is literally sitting in the corner of their playroom. And my little boy, every once in a while he goes, "It's ma.

Question:
It seems like this season there's a lot more emphasis placed on interpersonal relationships. Which ones did you enjoy reading in the scripts as they were being developed, the slow progression that finally is starting to pay off between Jack and Allison, the more combustible Jo and Zane, or the tentative baby steps that are happening between Fargo and Dr. Holly Marten?

Colin Ferguson:
Fargo and Holly.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I vote for Fargo and Holly too.

Question:
Why?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Because they're both so darned cute.

Colin Ferguson:
They're just great. It's one thing when a relationship gets started, going through its paces, and that's where we're into ours and no one finds their own lives too interesting. But, that'd be funny, wouldn't it. Like, "No ours is the most interesting," by far.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Yeah, ours is really by far the best story line.

Colin Ferguson:
???some of the best work on the show. And to be honest, you didn't mention it, but I would say my second one is actually Henry and Grace. I really like that relationship too. There's something really warm and there's something really warm and genuine of both of those relationships and I respond to them in a way. It's also really nice that they have these relationships going, so I think I respond to that. But, that's why I like them.

Question:
Will we see anymore of the Sarah/Andy relationship in any substantive way?

Colin Ferguson:
Yes, a very substantial way, yeah.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Yeah.

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah, that's also a great relationship, and I know it's really popular, give Sarah the house, and he's a robot, and all that stuff. And they're all fantastic actors. So really, Grace is in two relationships, you might say, as Sarah and Fargo; double duty.

Question:
Can you tease the Sarah/Andy just a little, give you us a little hint?

Colin Ferguson:
They take their relationship forward in a very profound way and we all have to make do as we live inside of he

Question:
Salli, you'll be directing an episode this season. Can you tell me how it felt to lord over the rest of your cast mates?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Oh, I love it, lord over. I did one last season, I guess you guys will be seeing that coming up this season. I don't know. I just finished the one that I'm shooting this season. Actually, just finished editing it yesterday, and I just love it. It's such a different thing from acting and my micromanaging in real life works very well for directing, and it's something that I would like to be the next step in my career. Luckily I have wonderful actors, you don't really have to direct that much more than say, "Can you tweak this one line?"

And I just found that I think that it's something that comes naturally to me and you don't know it until you get in there and do it. And I'm hoping to do more and more of it. And really, directing on Eureka has to be one of the best training grounds that any director could have because you get to do these wonderful dramatic story lines, but at the same time you get to learn about visual effects and green screen and you have stunts, you have comedy.

I'm learning these great skills to go to any other show that, and particularly not very many women know how to do, let alone Black women in this industry. So action and visual effect stuff is usually the job that they hire men to do, so I feel very blessed to learn these skills that I can take on and hopefully do a lot more things.

Question:
Colin, how was it for you? Were you like a model actor or were you like poking at her with a stick?

Colin Ferguson:
The funny thing is its really nice when one of us does direct because it's always great to have a cause to rally behind. We've done, I don't know how many episodes, close to eighty at this point, and you go, "Okay, great. At least there's a reason to show up today," you know? But I go with Salli's episode it's like, "Oh, great. Okay, well this is sort of cool."

And to the extent, what Salli's saying, it' s not only that you have to know how to do it on our show, I mean we're a cable show, so we don't have $4 million a week to get this stuff done. You can't learn on the fly, you have to know how to do it and know how to do it quickly. You can't figure it out. So, it's great training ground because it's trial by fire, which is fantastic. When I'm directing I'm all about making the day, and being relaxed, and I like a calm environment at this point, so I respond to how Salli directs because she's very calm and she knows what she wants.

Question:
What has been your favorite Allison and Jack moment so far?

Colin Ferguson:
I'd go back to magnetic fence.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
That one we have that was in our first season we got stuck together on this fence, but I also like when I was pregnant and the baby was kicking.

Colin Ferguson:
Oh, yeah. We were on the couch.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Yes, we were shooting this wonderful scene in my office when I was enormous at the time, and it was a very sweet scene where he's touching my stomach. But literally, when we were shooting every time Colin would touch my belly the baby, because I was really pregnant, the baby would kick right on his hand, like with every single take, Little Dre would go crazy in my stomach, so it was kind of funny.

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah, and Dre is a model athlete at this point in his life, so it really is no surprise that he ended up kicking on queue every single time.

Question:
In addition to Carter and Allison, we have Jo and Zane. While the timeline shift worked out well for your characters, it didn't work out so great for them as a couple. Can you give us any good news regarding their relationship on the episodes coming up?

Colin Ferguson:
They go through a lot and they keep going through a lot for the next year. And really, as of right now, we're still on the fence on if they're going to pull through, and that's a while later. Those two go through it. They definitely love each other, but it's a hard one. It's hard to watch sometimes when two people keep missing each other in the night, and then ultimately do or don't get together you go, "Oh, God, guys, just figure it out."

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
And isn't that real life?

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah.

Question:
What's the rest of the season looks like for Carter and Zoe? Will we be seeing anymore of her in Eureka?

Colin Ferguson:
Yes. Jordan definitely came back a couple times that season. She was actually over here yesterday. She's my designer. I'm getting some renovation done on my house and I'm going to be out of town. She came by with my contractor, Leif, Jordan and myself and she's handling all the design. I'm going to come back to a house that Jordan is designing.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
A 21-year old is designing.

Colin Ferguson:
Exactly. My closet's going to be filled with Forever 21. It's one of my favorite relationships and it's been amazing to watch her grow from a 13-year old to now being 20 and watching her life bloom into what she's created it today, and yeah, I love her and I love that relationship, and yes she comes back.

Question:
The show really emphasizes the science in the science fiction, and I was wondering if either of you had much of an interest in science before you joined the show?

Colin Ferguson:
Yes, definitely.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
For me, that would be no. I stumble through all my tech talk.

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah, which is a great blooper reel that we won't ever show. A great blooper real.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
We know when we're doing a read through when they're giving me this tech talk and we're just reading the script for the first time and I'm like, "Oh, you guys are killing me." I'm fine once I get there, but that first time I go through it I'm like, "Oh."

Colin Ferguson:
We also mess with Salli, and Sal actually my sister was in Hawaii two weeks ago and she was like, "Oh, we're going to Haleakala to hike the volcano." Because we'll purposely mispronounce words for about ten minutes just before Salli has to do it, like Haleakala. Like, I think it's Haleakala. I'm pretty sure it's Haleakala. Is it Haleakala? It's pronounced Haleakala.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
And I hate messing up on stuff, so I'm like, "Stop it. Stop it. I can barely remember this as it is." So for me it's very hard, but Colin is the person who doesn't really have to do it, probably is the one who would be the best at it.

Colin Ferguson:
I like it. I like science. I like the words. I like the thing. I mean we go into it in a show in an intensely more detailed manner than I ever do on my own, but I'm always interested in sort of what's going on technologically.

Question:
Do you ever get fans coming up to you and asking you strange questions about the science and stuff on the show?

Colin Ferguson:
No, when fans come up to me it's always like, "Are you the Dirty Jobs guy," you know? And I'm like "No," and it's like, "Oh, you're the Eureka guy. You're smaller than I thought." I take that to mean I read as incredibly manly on screen, that's what I think that means. But I'm six feet, I'm not small.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I'm mostly surprised that people, especially when we go to Comic-Con and stuff like that, I'm always surprised that they aren't asking more questions like that, because our fans, they love that stuff, but they really like the relationship stuff, which is cool.

Colin Ferguson:
I've got to say, our fans are amazing. It's like the most respectful, kind group of people. You hear the myth, and I'm going to call it a myth, Sci-Fi fans being crazy and intrusive and, boundary issues and all that stuff. And so, coming into it people were sort of like, "Whoa, watch out," and I've found exactly the opposite experience. They're like, "Oh, really like the show. Thanks. I don't want to disturb you, but," you know, and really, really respectful and differential and I love our fans.

Question:Colin Ferguson:
Can't really divulge any spoilers. We'll be strung up and hung if we do, but I mean what we said already and that's the key work for the next season. And then that key is off the next season after that.

Question:
What has been your favorite scientific invention on the show?

Colin Ferguson:
The bosencoladicsider.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Yeah, right

Colin Ferguson:
They make some castings from space, which cracks me up. It's like, "Oh, fire up some bosencoladicsider. We're going to catch something from space." You know how hard that is? It was like, "Okay, fire it up." And then there's that one scene where Zane's like, "I got an extra bosencoladicsider." Yeah, funny stuff.

Question:
What do you think is the special ingredient that makes Eureka such a draw to all ages?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
These last few years we've been doing it, I think it's just really the mixture. We were talking earlier that we have comedy, we have love, we have drama, we have the big explosions, and I really think that there's something for everyone. And it's also kept clean enough that you can have your ten-year old watching the show and you're not having to usher them in the other room, but it's not done in a corny way where adults can still enjoy the show. They really found a happy medium where anyone really can watch and enjoy it.

Colin Ferguson:
I remember the first season the mandate came down and were always being chastised saying, "This is not a comedy," you know, "Stop doing that, stop putting the jokes in. This is not a comedy." All the directors were told, "This is not a comedy." Because they were coming off Battlestar and it was going to be serious and all that stuff. And I think the comedy that we throw in and the writers write in really helps. It helps us take the sting off of ideas and be a little more self-aware and make it fun. When the show began I really wanted it to be dark and edgy and all this stuff, but then as we started hearing from people, like, "Oh, we watched this with our parents or I watched this with my kids, and my grandparents watch it."

And I guess I've gotten older I'm really proud of that. I'm really proud. It's a little better than it used to be, but for the last bunch of years it was all CSI and all murder and rape and just TV was hard, and it was really nice to do a show that people could watch together. It became a source of pride for us. So, what makes that work? I think we got lucky. The right combo worked and we were on a network that was patient enough to keep us on the air and if we knew what worked we could probably do it again, which is impossible.

Question:
What is the funniest thing you can recall that's gone wrong on the set so far this season?

Colin Ferguson:
There's always something going wrong. What happened this year? Some things go wrong and they're not funny, like when Frasier had his collar bone ripped out this year. That was funny. It was the one stunt I've ever said, "You know what," I'd been going through a rough time personally and I said, "You know what, I don't know the scene. I can't do it. Have Frasier do it." And Frasier went to do it and it tore out is collar bone and I was like, "Okay."

So we have things like that, but I would say the funniest thing that's gone wrong, what would that be? Probably Neil Grayson, a couple years ago, and jump in Sal if you have one, but when we use this stuff called Methocel, which is the stuff that's in McDonald's milkshakes and it's like a food additive. And one of the properties of Methocel, when you get covered in it, is that it wicks all the heat from your body, and then dries so it's really, really cold.

So, basically getting covered with stuff is sort of always an exercise in - and you know Neil was supposed to shoot first and ended up shooting six hours later, so he was covered in this stuff. I think he was painted green, standing in his trailer for six hours and that's because you're covered and you can sit down and you can't do anything, and he has glasses and he's functionally naked because he was naked in the scene.

So, he's got this little banana hammock and a bathing suit on, that provided us with endless amusement. And then, I guess right before we stopped shooting I was supposed to get peppered with paintballs, and those hurt, but there's this giant plaque that they're supposed to be pounding on, which they systematically missed more times than they hit over the course of the scene. And I'm supposed to be reacting like I'm in pain, which is like good and then after the scene, "Aren't you bruised?" In like four or five different places for like a week. Those things kill, the paintballs, so we always get up to no good with stuff like that.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Colin usually is the one getting tortured.

Question:
In the past you've done some character crossovers, will we be seeing more of that with other shows this season?

Colin Ferguson:
I think Grayson's doing another one. I think so. Yeah, I think he's doing another. I think they did one in February, so that'll air this summer. He's going to Warehouse 13 again, I believe, but I could be wrong, but I think that's correct, and I don't think anyone else is. I mean the hardest thing is because we all shoot at the same time, so the idea that I could get free or Salli could get free it's not in the cards.

We'd love to. In fact, Jack and I, the Executive Producer of Warehouse 13 were actors together in a show in 1999, so I've known Jack for about 12 years and I'd love to go up and work with him on a show. I think it'd be hilarious.

Question:
Do you find that when you do character crossovers does it change the dynamic on the set?

Colin Ferguson:
I would imagine, speaking for myself, if I was to go over to Warehouse 13. You have how you like to work, but it's their home and it's their show, and what they need for their show trumps anything that you could do. I know Jack and I know Eddie very well because we did The Circuit together for a while, and I did a movie with Joann. Saul did an episode of Eureka and Skaggs has been on Eureka, so we know them all and we know they're so kind and respectful it wouldn't be a problem. But, first and foremost in our minds would be like, "What do you guys need," you know? "We'll supply you with what you need."

Question:
Salli, would you ever do a character crossover yourself?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Oh, of course. Like Colin said, if they find the time I would love to go do it. It's always fun to go do something different, even though we would be doing our character it's fun doing someone else's show. Honestly I'd like to go over there and direct the show. I think that Colin would to.

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah would be great. Good plug, Sal, good plug. Well done.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Have us over. We'll act in it if you let us direct it. How about that?

Colin Ferguson:
Yeah, exactly, exactly, exactly.

Question:
Colin, how are you both like and not like your character?

Colin Ferguson:
I'm a Sheriff in real life, so that sums that up. No, personality-wise we're pretty similar at this point. They've done an amazing job of taking the best of me and making it palatable for other people, so yeah, the personality is the same. I guess the biggest difference would probably be relationships, I guess. He has a steadfast and that's how he makes things work, with Allison and he pushes through the problem, and that's something that I'm working on in my own life. A hard thing working out of town and trying to get something going back in Los Angeles, but that would probably be the biggest difference. But you know what, I'm working on it and I'll figure it out.

Question:
What have you most learned about yourself since you started this show?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I feel like I have grown so much as an actress and have learned that I'm better than I knew I was. I've just learned to really trust myself and I mean we've been there a lot of years now and even though I didn't come in there as a 20-year old girl, I've definitely grown up on this show and I feel like there's nothing that you could throw at me in particular as an actress leaving here that I couldn't do, and I've learned that from being on the show.

Colin Ferguson:
I would say Salli is doing the best work she's ever done. I would say even in between last year and this year it's amazing to see someone who you think is like, "Oh, she's Sal and she's great and Sal, she knows what she's doing, and she turned it up." I think she did a movie in the off-season. What was the name of the movie, Sal?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I Will Follow.

Colin Ferguson:
I Will Follow, which did amazingly, and the amount of confidence and presence and she's added sort of this improvising aspect to her work right now, which was never really a part of what she would do. She would all of a sudden this year it's like, "I'm going to say this. I'm going to go over here. I'm going to do this," and it's like, "Oh, my God," and it's amazing to see all of this in her own way, add little bits to our repertoire as we go through things. It's really encouraging.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Colin has always had that, which is an amazing talent, that he can come up with the line right there and change this and do that, and it just happens so naturally. And that's something I was always afraid of and Colin has never been afraid to be big and go there and try anything, and I've had to learn that.

Colin Ferguson:
I don't know my lines half the time anyway.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Oh, that's how you do it, okay.

Colin Ferguson:
It's an intense lack of prep, let's procrastinate a little bit more. No, I would say for me, it's really interesting. It is something that you can mark the passage of time by because it has been six years and who you were six years ago and who you are now, they're very different people. I have a respect for my body that I didn't before. I really try to not damage it so much. And that may seem just like, "Oh, he's getting old," but it's sort of respect and I have more respect for, God, I guess life and emotion and all sorts of things that I didn't have before.

I was sort of all about work before. And just the difficulty, this is not a fun answer, but the difficulty of shooting and the trauma and the tragedy of not being around those that you love, while you are doing 14 hours a day for five months in a row. Sal has two kids, and we look to each other to sort of pull each other through and you end up having a huge respect for relationships and stuff like that and that wasn't there for me. I respected it, but not in the way that I do now. I really think they're special.

Question:
What's something that people would be surprised to know about you?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I play golf. On my time off I play golf every day. I'm a big golfer. That always seems to surprise people. They're like, "Really, you don't look like a golfer." So there you go, that's all I can think of.

Colin Ferguson:
I'm shy, in my own way and I think when people get to know me I'm brash and I'm all sorts of things, and there's this one side of me which is very out there, but people who know me know me as someone who's quite different. I mean, that's always sort of strange for them when they go, "Oh, wow, he's actually quite shy."

Question:
What would you consider to be your definitive episode of Eureka?

Colin Ferguson:
I think that there are a bunch of episodes that meant different things at different times for us, and I definitely clock them that way. I remember when a good friend of mind, Johanna Stokes wrote, wow what was that called, it was Game, something about Game. It was like first or second season, and when a friend of yours writes an episodes that's a great thing. I remember the first time Salli directed, that's a big thing. I remember the first time I directed, which was, Your Face or Mine. It was a smaller episode and that was a huge thing for me.

So, there's these more in point episodes all the way through, which sort of mean the world to us, like the first one that Alexandria directed, we fought really hard for our script supervisor to get an episode to direct. She directed A Dead Zone before and is really one of the people who held the show together when it was going through rough times. It was, Lexi and myself a lot of times, fighting for the best work that we could get. And for her to be rewarded and respected by getting an episode was absolutely huge for us as a cast. It felt like we'd had a big victor, and she could do an amazing job. Hers is the bank episode.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
I can't think of one in particular. I think when we find the ones that really have that middle ground of the comedy, that banter back and forth comedy that we have, and then they throw in some of the Syfy that is a real Eureka episode for me. There's one's you just read and you just go, "Okay, that is so Eureka," with the comedy and a little bit of the danger. But, I can never remember exact ones.

Question:
What would be your ultimate dream role?

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Just recently I was able to do this performance honoring Halle Berry for the Genesee Foundation and I performed as Lena Horne. And that's something I'm working on trying to make happen and would be my ultimate dream, because I loved her as an icon and I loved to sing and I always loved her musicals, so that's also why I've been pushing our show. I don't know how Colin feels about this, but I would love to do a musical Eureka. I keep getting Tweeted about it too. People are like,, "When are you going to do a musical?" I would love to do that.

Colin Ferguson:
Salli has an amazing singing voice.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Colin is a great singer too.

Colin Ferguson:
I do not. There are different levels of singing. There are people who can like with enough work I can hold a tune, and that's about where I'm at, with enough work I can hold a tune. Salli has a fantastic singing voice.

Salli Richardson-Whitfield:
Well, we'll sound really good in the studio. That's all that counts.

Colin Ferguson:
Oh, that would be great. A musical would be fine.

Question:
What about your dream role, Colin?

Colin Ferguson:
I'd really like to do something where I conceived of it, shot it, maybe acted in it, and then edited it. Coming from TV where we, out of necessity we have to move so quickly, it'd be really nice to move slower and take some time or something and really sort of hone it. So, it doesn't really matter what it is, as long as it was with friends. I really want to work with my friends at this point doing stuff that I want to do. I think a lot of actors feel that way these days, particularly with the Canon 5D being so comparable to the F23, Viper, or the Genesis or all the different cameras that we use. In fact, we're using the 5D more and more and more and that's a cheap camera that you can get from the consumer line anywhere in the country.

I think that with the technology finally getting to the place where anybody with a story can tell it, it's a really exciting time to be someone who wants to tell a story. So, I'd like to do something like that I think and see where I fall on my face there.

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