index_corner.gif - 11174 Bytes Banner.jpg - 11843 Bytes
Justice League
UPDATES


Follow Pazsaz Entertainment Network at Twitter!  Become a fan of Pazsaz Entertainment Network on Facebook!  Connect to Pazsaz Entertainment Network on Myspace!  See what Pazsaz Entertainment Network likes on Pinterest  Read the Pazsaz Entertainment Network Blog
OUR SPONSORS

index_center_banner.gif - 14958 Bytes

Bookmark and Share
 
Grimm Interviewby Pattye Grippo    

Grimm

This is an interview with David Greenwalt and Jim Kouf on January 26, 2012 about the show Grimm.

Question:
Anything you might be able to announce about a Season 2 today?

Jim Kouf:
I wish.

David Greenwalt:
We've got plenty of mythology waiting for Season 2, and we've got plenty of good things to happen. As soon as we get it we'll know.

Question:
How many more episodes do we get this season?

Jim Kouf:
We got a back nine.

David Greenwalt:
We have a back nine, so we'll do 22 total this season, and we're shooting the 16th episode as we speak.

Question:
Last week we started hearing about the group of those who do not approve of Monroe helping Nick. Are we going to be hearing a lot more about them?

David Greenwalt:
There will be some issues with that coming up for sure.

Question:
Anything you want to tell us about?

David Greenwalt:
Well, it's going to fold over into the next year, some of these troubles that haunt him.

Jim Kouf:
It's a pretty deep mythology, we're just cracking the surface right now. Some of that will become more apparent in the episodes that are coming up here very soon.

Question:
Since Josh Whedon has done so much directing and writing episodes for other shows, have you thought about seeing if he'd like to do a one-off for your show?

David Greenwalt:
That son of a bitch! He's got to come do one for us. And you know as soon as I saw Josh at Comic-Con, of course we would love to have him write, direct, or do craft service you know.

Jim Kouf:
He's free. He's pretty good with a bagel, I'm telling you.

Question:
Did you guys expect Monroe to take off as a break out character he's become?

David Greenwalt:
Yes.

Jim Kouf:
He has done good.

David Greenwalt:
I think yes, we kind of did. Because when we first wrote it and we realized we were on to something tremendous, and when we got Silas Wier Mitchell to play him, he's just such an interesting character with a different slant. And in a way, he's more human than the human characters because he's fighting his inner demons so forcefully.

Jim Kouf:
Yes. He also gets exactly what we're going for with the character. Silas is just on the money.

David Greenwalt:
So we like to think of them all as break out characters, you know.

Question:
Will it turn out that Nick has not been a true Grimm as he approaches the job like a police detective rather than as a Grimm is supposed to be, which is the Boogie Man?

Question:
A Grimm is the Boogie Man of the monsters.

David Greenwalt:
Nick is not your average, everyday Grimm, and he does operate differently than some Grimm's have traditionally operated. And, we'll learn more about that this very season.

Question:
The show seems to be moving from a monster of the week format to a show with a larger mythology. Was this the plan all along, or did you work it out as you went?

David Greenwalt:
It was kind of the plan all along to bring in more mythology as we get deeper in the series, but we don't want to bring in so much that your average everyday viewer can't just watch a show and so there'll certainly be a case of the week if not a monster of the week every time. But in these back nine, you're going to see a lot more of the personal and back stories of everybody.

Jim Kouf:
We're going to start revealing stuff.

David Greenwalt:
I can't even remember what the plan was on Buffy and Angel. But, I'm sure there was a plan.

Question:
Do you find that your experience working on other supernatural shows influences the way you approached Grimm?

David Greenwalt:
Kind of yes and no. I mean obviously those were great experiences with great people, but you know working with my old partner Jim again we do it a little differently. We do it one inch at a time you know. We just start at the beginning and move forward you know.

Although, we do have a little bible of the overarching mythology and where we think we're going in years to come. So the answer to that question is kind of a yes and no thing. It's just - you know, Grimm is its own creature and has its own kind of set of rules. But I love it when there's an emotional resonance in the stories.

Question:
Are we going to see any of the creatures that we've seen already?

Jim Kouf:
We hope so.

David Greenwalt:
Yes, we certainly hope so. And if not this year, next year.

Jim Kouf:
Yes.

David Greenwalt:
We'd love to do like a Dirty Dozen episode.

Jim Kouf:
You'll see there's some recurring characters coming up in the next episode. Not necessarily those, but from other episodes they're recurring.

Question:
How important was it to you to bring in a female character with Brie Turner on the show?

David Greenwalt:
Really important to us, and she's got a great role. And you know, she's going to help balance out the power table there.

Jim Kouf:
We also have some great female actors coming up too.

David Greenwalt:
Yes. There's an episode coming up in February called Terentella where Amy Acker has a great role. Amy Acker. And then you know, Valarie Cruz is in a show called Organ Grinder, which is coming I think a week from Friday.

Jim Kouf:
Yes.

David Greenwalt:
So we like to have Nick fight those women.

Question:
There's been subtleties planted with Julia all season long, and you sense some type of foreshadowing. Is there a clear direction with her, since she's been so mysterious, and on a different level than a lot of the other characters.

David Greenwalt:
Well there's something pretty darn big coming for her for sure. And we watch some of the blog site and Twitter and all this, and a lot of people have opinions of what she might be or what's to come. But we think we're going to surprise them.

Question:
What's the biggest challenge In keeping Hank in the dark as to what's really going on?

David Greenwalt:
You need to have two explanations in most of the episodes of something that could've happened in the real world and something that has a Grimm story. So the biggest challenge is to have two explanations for everything.

Question:
Two of the best shows this year have been shows based in fantasy and in science fiction from Once Upon A Time to your show Grimm. What do you think it is about shows like that still appeal to the normal TV viewer?

David Greenwalt:
Well two words from a business point of view; public domain. But from a you know consumption point of view, people love these stories, and there's a reason they've been handed down, you know both in a written and in oral form for all these hundreds and hundreds of years and they still have an appeal. And we're you know not only taking old fairy tales and kind of fracturing them - for example, it's coming up in February where we're fracturing Hansel and Gretel and a very little known Japanese fairy tale.

But, we're also making sort of new fairy tales of what's going on today and putting it in a fairy tale context. Our conceit is that all the writers of fairy tales were in fact some kind of profilers.

Question:
How many stories did the Grimm Brothers actually write?

David Greenwalt:
It's about 205 that they wrote down, and you know they took them from various peasants and people. But, some of them are you know a little hard to adapt, like the Sausage and the Donkey. They're just like sausage and Donkey go to town and play music. So not every single one lends itself to a great big episode.

Question:
When will they mention to you all about a second season?

David Greenwalt:
We don't know. Sometime between now and May but it looks not unpromising at this point.

Question:
My favorite episode so far has been the one with the Tree Little Pigs because it was such a reverse on the actual, so are we going to see more episodes similar to that? Where you kind of dirty up the original?

David Greenwalt:
We are. We will see episodes in which you know, we'll see a couple of those. As a matter of fact, the kind of critters who are generally you know downtrodden and have been you know, beaten down by stronger, badder critters you know will get their day in court.

Question:
Are we going to address the whole Captain with his Grimm royalty and stuff? Like are going to get that this season?

David Greenwalt:
We're going to get some of it. We're definitely getting some of it. You'll be seeing more of him up to all kinds of things.

Question:
What is it about this genre that you enjoy writing about the most?

Jim Kouf:
The freedom of it. We're not locked into you know reality. We can play with reality a little bit, which makes it more fun to write.

David Greenwalt:
And I love taking a procedural show and just having a guy turn into a Blutbad or a Bauerschwein. It's just so much fun because it feels like I'm watching a regular kind of procedural show and then suddenly there's critters.

Jim Kouf:
It gives us the opportunity to explain human behavior in a very bizarre way.

David Greenwalt:
You know, the child molester is a Big Bad Wolf, et cetera. We're going to explain war and famine and all the ills of the world. It's all because of these crazy critters out there.

Question:
Is Juliette officially Nick's fiance yet?

David Greenwalt:
Stay tuned.

Question:
I was really impressed with the pilot. Just the whole style and look of the show. Who's responsible for that? Did you guys decide on a certain style? Sort of that ethereal, yet lush kind of feel to the visuals?

Jim Kouf:
Yes.

David Greenwalt:
Yes. We picked Portland for that reason, but we had great help from our Producer Steve Oster and the Director of the pilot Marc Buckland.

Jim Kouf:
And Clark Mathis who shot the pilot.

David Greenwalt:
And Eades, who did the construction design.

Jim Kouf:
Portland played a big role in that.

David Greenwalt:
Yes.

Question:
Are we going to get any more information about Marie's back story?

Jim Kouf:
Yes. It's coming up.

David Greenwalt:
You're going to learn more about her and the whole history of how this came to be, and on both sides of the Grimm's and the critter sides.

Question:
You call them the critters. Is that how we're supposed to call them?

Jim Kouf:
They're called Wesen.

David Greenwalt:
W-E-S-E-N, and it's pronounced Vesen, and that's all the different Grimm creatures are called Wesen. But people don't know that so I call them critters.

Question:
You both got a history of working in genre TV. Is that something you favor in your own personal viewing habits? What do you guys watch?

David Greenwalt:
We watch ourselves going to sleep at night after a long, hard day.

Jim Kouf:
We like Jon Stewart.

Question:
I'm really loving the dynamic between Nick and Monroe. Did you guys always know that they'd have such chemistry, or was that kind of a pleasant surprise?

Jim Kouf:
It was a pleasant surprise as we created the character in the pilot. We knew that if they gave us a series we could really do something with that relationship.

David Greenwalt:
And we knew Monroe would be a regular from the get go.

Question:
What's next for these two? Will we see Monroe giving like Nick Pilate's lessons or anything?

Jim Kouf:
We'll see them helping one another and sometimes Monroe will even come to Nick for help.

Question:
There's the danger that Monroe seems to be in. And Nick and Juliette also seem to be in danger. Do you think this is all going to come to a head as the season comes to a close?

Jim Kouf:
Yes.

David Greenwalt:
Yes.

Jim Kouf:
It is.

David Greenwalt:
It is. And bad things are going to keep happening to them as they try to live their lives.

Jim Kouf:
This will be a many-headed beast.

Question:
Music seems to be a pretty powerful asset with this show. As Executive Producers, how important do you find it that the element of music is involved? And is it something we'll continue to hear?

David Greenwalt:
Yes.

Jim Kouf:
Yes.

David Greenwalt:
We loved music. We have a great composer, Rick Marvin and we get terrific songs when we need them. The ones you mentioned. And we loved that episode with the rats where we had classical and techno music in the same episode. We thought that was kind of neat.

Question:
Do you listen to what they're saying as you know, a congratulation and a compliment, or as something you know to keep in mind and consider from moving forward and determining what they react best to?

Jim Kouf:
We listen to everything they say.

David Greenwalt:
Yes. We try to do all of the above and see what people are responding to and what people are liking.

Question:
On Eddie, do you think that maybe as he becomes more connected with Nick that maybe the other community will shun him totally and maybe effect his effectiveness to help out Nick?

Jim Kouf:
No. Because not all the Wesen are bad, so some will think what he's doing is actually a good thing.

David Greenwalt:
But he will have to pay for his sins.

Jim Kouf:
Yes.

Question:
Is he really the last Grimm or could there be a hidden descendant that could step up? Like maybe to help with your Dirty Dozen creature reappearance?

Jim Kouf:
Oh, no. There will be more.

David Greenwalt:
There are other Grimm's in the world. It's a rare thing, but there are other Grimm's in the world. They're all descendent from the Brothers Grimm. But yes, there may be somebody even in his line.

Question:
Any designs maybe to do some graphic novels just to fill in some back story?

David Greenwalt:
Young adult novels. Graphic novels. We hope video games.

Jim Kouf:
Yes. We hope to fill in the back story on the show.

Question:
Out of all the episodes you guys have shot so far, is there one that you found especially challenging perhaps to pull off from a production standpoint would you say?

Jim Kouf:
All of them.

David Greenwalt:
All of them. There is a couple coming in February sweeps here. One is called The Last Grimm Standing and it's coming in about three weeks and change, which is a monster to shoot. A monster to write. It's a gladiatorial kind of big fighting episode, and our great team in Portland just pulled out all the stops for that one.

Question:
I'm really enjoying David in the Nick role. And I was wondering perhaps if you could tell us a little bit about casting the Nick character and finding David to fit those shoes?

Jim Kouf:
It wasn't easy.

David Greenwalt:
We saw a lot of people.

Jim Kouf:
Yes.

David Greenwalt:
It's a hard guy to find as you know in television, a guy in that age range who is kind of fresh faced and new, and yet seems to have all the talent and the work history to be able to shoulder a whole show like that. And we've just been so lucky with this cast. They're all really, really good and really fantastic people.

Jim Kouf:
And very nice people.

David Greenwalt:
We've been blessed.

Question:
If NBC asks you to change nights, would you?

David Greenwalt:
It's a very interesting the way our life works. If Mr. Greenblatt says you're changing nights, we say, ???Yes sir.??? But I think rightly so, and certainly we have lobbied, we love this 9:00 Friday slot. It's the old X-Files slot. It's the right place to be. We're doing a good number, and I think they have no plans to move us that we certainly know of at this point.

Question:
I just had a quick question about Russell Hornsby. How did you go about casting him as Hank Griffin?

David Greenwalt:
He was the best guy who came in and we had a lot of great guys that came in and read for that role, but there's something really special, really cool but warm at the same time about Russell. And we just fell in love and he won it in the casting process.

Jim Kouf:
Yes. He brings an authority to the role which is great.

David Greenwalt:
Yes. An ease and authority. And we've got some really cool stuff coming for him, and his world is going to get rocked by a woman.

Question:
Will it be the creature that he does not know is a creature?

David Greenwalt:
Might be.

Question:
I like the current formula where you currently have a covert reveal of the monster at the beginning of the episode. But, will you eventually change that or actually have a human as the perpetrator for the crime?

David Greenwalt:
We did it initially in the episode last week in this Of Mouse and Man in which the man, not the mouse, was the perpetrator of the crime. We'll do all kinds of different things. And sometimes there'll be a good Wesen. You know, a good creature. And sometimes the bad people are just normal humans and it's the Wesen or the Grimm creatures who are in trouble. We'll mix it up.

Question:
Do you ever watch Once Upon A Time and hope for or a fake cross your fingers that they won't cover a similar story right before you cover it?

David Greenwalt:
We don't really have time. We're not watching any other shows. We're kind of living here in the office and doing this show. We wish them the best and we wish ourselves the best. I think there may be some fairy tale characters that are similar, but the shows are so incredibly different that I don't think it matters.

Question:
I presume you've heard about Beauty and the Beast thing that's going on with a few pilots and been given green light from ABC and CW?

David Greenwalt:
Yes.

Question:
From your standpoint, is that a good, more the merrier good thing, or does it kind of dilute the pool?

Jim Kouf:
I don't think it really matters.

David Greenwalt:
I think it's a neutral move because like you say, if a show is good is what matters. The rest doesn't really you know matter.

Jim Kouf:
Yes. Our job is to keep the writing strong and the shows strong, and hopefully we're delivering good entertainment every week. So that's our job.

Question:
What's been the biggest challenge and what's the most fun about this show for each of you?

Jim Kouf:
The biggest challenge is producing the shows because we're writing actually what we feel are movies that they're producing on a TV schedule. So hats off to our production team in Portland who actually is you know given the task of making these things, and they're difficult. They're physically challenging to make. That's the hardest part. The most fun for me is the mythology that we're getting into and the chance to explore some fun stuff coming up.

David Greenwalt:
And for me the most challenging thing is to get to the office before noon. And the most exciting thing is seeing these shows on television and when they come out really good and they really work, and they're dark and psychological and kind of funny. And that feels very satisfying and encourages me to get up in the morning and get in and work with Jim.

  • Return to Articles at Pazsaz Entertainment Network
  •  
    Site Sponsors Check this out!    

    Disneyland
    ARTICLES
    OUR SPONSORS

    | Copyright & Disclaimer | FAQ | Privacy Policy | Partners | Discussion Board | Feedback |
    Copyright © 1991-2017, Pazsaz Entertainment Network, All Rights Reserved.
    Space